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Creative Growth Art Center in "San Francisco Bay Area"

Founded four decades ago, at the height of the disability-rights movement, Creative Growth Art Center is a nonprofit organization serving artists with physical and cognitive disabilities. Telling the story of remarkable individuals—Dan Miller, Judith Scott, William Scott, and Monica Valentine—and a uniquely productive artist community, this segment explores the idea that artmaking is a fundamental human practice and should be accessible to all.

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Closed captionsAvailable in English, German, Romanian, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Chinese, Italian

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Creative Growth Art Center

Creative Growth Art Center was founded by Elias and Florence Katz in 1974. Operating in a former car-body shop near downtown Oakland, California, Creative Growth provides studios, gallery space, and supplies to more than 150 artists with developmental, mental, and physical disabilities, who work in a wide array of media. Predicated on the belief that art is fundamental to human expression and that all people are entitled to its tools of communication, Creative Growth is an incubator of artistic activity that has fostered exemplary artists, such as Dan Miller, Judith Scott, William Scott, and Monica Valentine.

“Creative Growth is about artistic expression as a form of self-empowerment, as a form of aesthetic development. As a form of saying, this is who I am in the world.”

Tom di Maria, Director of Creative Growth Art Center