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Lynn Hershman Leeson in "San Francisco Bay Area"

Lynn Hershman Leeson is at once a pointed critic and a sly practical jokester, as she explores the roles that technology, media, and artifice play in society. This episode surveys the artist’s richly varied body of work, from her early performances as the fictional character Roberta Breitmore to the more recent Vertighost, a work incorporating surveillance video and sculpture that offers a feminist riff on Alfred Hitchcock’s “Vertigo.” Overlooked for the better part of her decades-long career, Leeson is now recognized as a pioneering multidisciplinary artist and critiques the gender biases that excluded her and other women artists.

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Closed captionsAvailable in English, German, Romanian, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Chinese, Italian

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Lynn Hershman Leeson

Lynn Hershman Leeson was born in Cleveland, Ohio in 1941. At once a pointed critic and a sly practical jokester, Leeson has worked across a wide range of mediums, from drawing, painting and sculpture to interactive films, net-based media works, and artificial intelligence. Overlooked for the better part of her decades-long career, Leeson is a pioneering multidisciplinary artist, critiquing the deep seated gender biases that have excluded her and other women artists.

“I think that I’m asking viewers to consider what is real, what isn’t real. Why we need to imitate something, and the credibility of the things around us.”

Lynn Hershman Leeson