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Structures

The artists in Structures create systems, shift contexts, and engage with perception, utilizing unconventional devices such as exhibitions within exhibitions and dramatic shifts in scale between microcosm and macrocosm. Introduced by actor Sam Waterston, Structures is shot on location in Akureyri, Iceland; London, England; New York, New York; Houston, Texas; North Adams, Massachussetts; São Paolo, Brazil; Newark, New Jersey; Göteborg, Sweden; Santa Fe, New Mexico; and Austin, Texas.

More information and credits

Credits

Created by: Susan Sollins & Susan Dowling. Executive Producer & Curator: Susan Sollins. Series Producer: Eve-Laure Moros Ortega. Associate Producer: Migs Wright. Assistant Curator: Wesley Miller. Production Manager: Alice Bertoni. Production Coordinator: Kelly Shindler. Producer: Catherine Tatge. Editor: Steven Wechsler. Host: Sam Waterston. Director of Photography: Kurt Branstetter, Terry Doe, Bob Elfstrom, Clas Hakeröd, Mead Hunt, Matz Jansson, Rodrigo Menck, James Reid, & Joel Shapiro. Sound: Abrão Cesar, Danny Clayton, Ray Day, Ron Garson, Judy Karp, Matti Karlsson, Mark Mandler, J.T. Takagi, & Merce Williams. Steadicam: John Ford. Gaffer: Lamar Bloodworth. Assistant Camera: Craig Feldman, Brian Hwang, Kipjaz Savoie, & Trent Wittenbach. Production Assistant: Rob Cauble, Erica Gannett, Justin Leitstein, & Mary Jo Mauro. Assistant Avid Editor: Robert Achs, Jamie Courville, Sean Frechette, Mike Heffron, David Kreger, Cara Leroy O’Connell, Joaquin Perez, Aaron Sheddrick, & Lynn True. Still Photographers: Alice Bertoni & Bob Elfstrom.

Creative Consultant: Ed Sherin. Art Design & Animation: Open, New York. On-Line Editor: Don Wyllie & Frame:Runner NYC. Composer: Peter Foley. Voice-Over Artist: Jace Alexander. Sound Editing: Margaret Crimmins, Greg Smith, & Dog Bark Sound. Sound Mix: Tony Volante & Sound Lounge. Animation Stand: Frank Ferrigno & Frame:Runner NYC. Introductory Host Segments Created by: INTERspectacular. Commissioned Video Art by: Teresa Hubbard / Alexander Birchler.

Artworks Courtesy of: Roni Horn; Matthew Ritchie; Richard Tuttle; Fred Wilson; The Drawing Center, New York; Crown Point Press, San Francisco; Matthew Marks Gallery, New York; Metro Pictures, New York; Andrea Rosen Gallery, New York; PaceWildenstein, New York; & Sperone Westwater Gallery, New York.

Special Thanks: Mariana Valdrighi Amaral; The Art21 Board of Trustees; The Art Institute of Chicago; Margrét Blöndal; Charlotte Burns; Jordan Bastien; Jim Caffrey; Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston; Curious Pictures; Victoria Cuthbert; Ali Evans; Andrea Hall; R.S. Hahn; Hauser & Wirth Gallery, London; Garland Hunter; Petra Johansson; Jennifer Joy; Jeannie and Michael Klein; Sarah Kurz; John Landewe; MASS MoCA; The Museum of World Culture, Sweden; Neta Normo; Karen Polack; Rutgers Center for Innovative Print and Paper; Larry Smallwood; XXVI São Paulo Bienal; Soundtrack F/T; The Studio Museum in Harlem; Tai Gallery, Santa Fe; Ttweak; University of Akureyri, Iceland; & Georgia Loy Weinberg.

Director of Education & Outreach: Jessica Hamlin. Director of Development: Kathi Pavlick. Development Associate: Sara Simonson.

Interns: Susan Agliata, Nathan Townes-Anderson, Hannah Blumenthal, Agnes Bolt, Lisa Charde, Mary Chou, Kate Crawford, Amanda Donnan, Sophie Dunoyer de Segonzac, Suzy Foster, Jules Gaffney, Katie Hen, Heather Hughes, Adam Krakowski, Georgia Kung, David Mark Kupperberg, Maiko Kyogoku, Phil Logan, Lisa Margulies, Michelle Maydanchik, Carla Meyers, Christine Miller, Geoffrey Pan, Sujay Pandit, Jihan Robinson, Jennifer Sarkilahti, Megan Scally, Karen Seapker, Greg Shilling, Sarah Sliwa, Jennifer Smith, & Elizabeth Swift.

Public Relations: Kelly & Salerno Communications. Station Relations: De Shields Associates, Inc. Legal Counsel: Albert Gottesman. Bookkeeper: Marea Alverio-Chaveco & William Handy.

Major underwriting for Art in the Twenty-First Century Season Three provided by: National Endowment for the Arts; Public Broadcasting Service; Agnes Gund and Daniel Shapiro; Nathan Cummings Foundation; Corporation for Public Broadcasting; Jon and Mary Shirley Foundation; Bagley Wright Fund; Bloomberg; The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation; JPMorgan Chase; Melva Bucksbaum and Raymond Learsy; The Paul G. Allen Family Foundation; & The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.

Closed captionsAvailable in English, German, Romanian, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Chinese, Italian

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Fred Wilson

Appropriating curatorial methods and strategies, Fred Wilson creates new contexts for the display of art and artifacts found in museum collections, along with wall labels, sound, lighting, and non-traditional pairings of objects. His sculptures and installations lead viewers to recognize that changes in context create changes in meaning, and thereby shape interpretations of historical truth and artistic value.

Hubbard/Birchler

Teresa Hubbard and Alexander Birchler live and work in Austin, Texas, as life partners and artist-collaborators. Together they make short films and photographs about the construction of narrative time and space, without the context of a traditional story line; their open-ended, enigmatic narratives elicit multiple readings. They began their collaboration in the mid-1990s, making sculpture, installation, photography, and performance-based work. Their interest in the construction and negotiation of space, architecture, and the function of objects in three dimensions plays a primary role in their work. Their productions reveal a strong sense of carefully constructed mise-en-scène that owes as much to natural-history-museum dioramas as to cinematic directorial techniques.

Matthew Ritchie

Matthew Ritchie’s artistic mission has been no less ambitious than an attempt to represent the entire universe and the structures of knowledge and belief that we use to understand and visualize it. The artist’s paintings, installations, and narrative threads delineate the universe’s formation as well as the attempts and limits of human consciousness to comprehend its vastness. Although often described as a painter, Ritchie creates works on paper, prints, light-box drawings, floor-to-wall installations, freestanding sculpture, websites, and short stories, which tie his sprawling works together into a narrative structure.

Richard Tuttle

Even when considering his three-dimensional works, Richard Tuttle commonly refers to his art as drawing rather than sculpture—the distinction emphasizing the diminutive scale and idea-based nature of his work. Influenced by calligraphy, architecture, and poetry, he subverts the conventions of modernist sculptural practice by creating small, eccentrically playful objects in humble, fragile materials. Tuttle also manipulates the space in which his objects exist, placing them unnaturally high or oddly low on a wall—forcing viewers to reconsider and renegotiate the white-cube gallery space in relation to their own bodies.

Roni Horn

Roni Horn explores the mutable nature of art through sculptures, works on paper, photography, and books. She describes drawing as the key activity in all her work, “because drawing is about composing relationships.” Horn’s drawings concentrate on the materiality of the objects depicted. Horn crafts complex relationships between the viewer and her work by installing a single piece on opposing walls, in adjoining rooms, or throughout a series of buildings. Horn’s work also embodies the cyclical relationship between humankind and nature—a mirror-like relationship in which we attempt to remake nature in our own image.

“A painting or a sculpture really exists somewhere between what it is and what it is not.”

Richard Tuttle

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