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Loss & Desire

Thoughts and responses to themes of Loss & Desire surface in many areas of our lives, from the philosophical to the emotional. In this episode, specific works of art cause us to contemplate issues such as war and peace; the loss of community and the desire for connection; and the age-old human longing for perfection.

Filmed on location in New York, New York; West Point, New York; Blair, New Jersey; Stuttgard, Germany; Paris, France; Mexico; and Santa Fe, New Mexico.

More information and credits

Credits

Created by: Susan Sollins & Susan Dowling. Executive Producer & Curator: Susan Sollins. Series Producer: Eve-Laure Moros Ortega. Associate Producer: Migs Wright. Assistant Curator: Wesley Miller. Production Manager: Alice Bertoni & Laura Recht. Production Coordinator: Kelly Shindler & Sara Simonson. Director of Education & Outreach: Jessica Hamlin. Consulting Director: Charles Atlas. Editor: Joanna Kiernan. Host Segment Artist: Charles Atlas. Host: Jane Alexander. Director of Photography: Martial Barrault, Bob Elfstrom, Mead Hunt, Ken Kobland, William Rexer, Joel Shapiro, & Dyanna Taylor. Sound: Doug Dunderdale, Jim Gallup, Judith Karp, Mark Mandler, Caleb Mose, Andre Rigaud, & Bill Wander. Gaffer/Grip: Chris Flurry, Jeff Howison, Alan Jacobsen, Michael Lamb, & Zach Zamboni. Assistant Camera: Jarred Alterman, Steve Banister, Cyril Mulon, Kipjaz Savoie, & Lieven Van Hulle. Host Make-Up: Joanne Nöél. Props: Jesus Aguilar & Sandy Handloser. Production Assistant: Eric Kutner, Guillermo Luna Rosales, Dawn Watson, & Yahia Zadek. Assistant Avid Editor: Anne Alvergue, Geoff Gruetzmacher, Jeremy Siefer, & Lynn True. Still Photography: Alice Bertoni, Bob Elfstrom, & Julie Graber.

Creative Consultant: Ed Sherin. Graphic Design & Animation: Open, New York. Animation, Visual Effects & Compositing: Spontaneous Combustion. On-Line Editor: Don Wyllie & Frame:Runner NYC. Composer: Peter Foley. Voice-Over Artist: Jace Alexander. Sound Editing: Margaret Crimmins, Greg Smith, & Dog Bark Sound. Sound Mix: Tony Volante & Soundtrack F/T. Animation Stand: Frank Ferrigno & Frame:Runner NYC.

Artworks courtesy of: Janine Antoni; Gabriel Orozco; Collier Schorr; Galerie Chantal Crousel, Paris; Luhring Augustine Gallery; Magasin 3, Stockholm; Marian Goodman Gallery; Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego; SITE Santa Fe; & 303 Gallery. Archival footage courtesy of: Juan Carlos Martín.

Special Thanks: The Art21 Board of Trustees; Rocío Barajas; Jamie Bennett; Blair Academy; Scott Cohen; Cate Ellison; The Graduate School and University Center/CUNY; Nora Kabat; Megan Laborious; La Tuilerie, Treigny; Herbert Molner; SITE Santa Fe; & West Point US Military Academy.

Interns: Sharon Ber, Elana Davidian, Eliza Geddes, Karmin Guzder, Ehren Joseph, Lisa Kalikow, Lila Kanner, Crystal Kui, Daniela Leonard, Ronny Merdinger, Parth Savla, Kristen Smith, Whitney Smith, Morgan Soloski, Jo-ey Tang, Asya Varshishky, Jesse Whittle-Utter, & Jeremy Zilar.

Public Relations: Kelly & Salerno Communications. Legal Counsel: Albert Gottesman. Bookkeeper: William Handy.

Major underwriting for Art in the Twenty-First Century Season Two provided by: National Endowment for the Arts; Public Broadcasting Service; Corporation for Public Broadcasting; The Allen Foundation for the Arts; Agnes Gund and Daniel Shapiro; Bloomberg; The Jon and Mary Shirley Foundation; Nonprofit Finance Fund; JPMorgan Chase; The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts; The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation; New York Arts Recovery Fund; Peter Norton Family Foundation; New York Times Company Foundation; Dorothea L. Leonhart Foundation; & Elizabeth Firestone Graham Foundation.

Closed captionsAvailable in English, German, Romanian, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Chinese, Italian

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Licensing

Interested in showing this film in an exhibition or public screening? To license this video please visit Licensing & Reproduction.

Charles Atlas

Charles Atlas is a filmmaker and video artist who has created numerous works for stage, screen, museum, and television. Atlas is a pioneer in the development of media-dance, a genre in which original performance work is created directly for the camera. Many of Atlas’s works have been collaborations with choreographers, dancers, and performers, including Yvonne Rainer, Michael Clark, Douglas Dunn, Marina Abramovic, Diamanda Galas, John Kelly, and Leigh Bowery. Atlas acted as Consulting Director for “Art in the Twenty-First Century” (Seasons 2 through 5), creating the original opening programs for each hour-long segment of Season 2, as well as supervising the “Stories,” “Loss and Desire,” “Memory,” “Play,” “Protest,” and “Paradox” episodes.

Collier Schorr

Best known for her portraits of adolescent men and women, Collier Schorr ‘s pictures often blend photographic realism with elements of fiction and youthful fantasy. For her 1998 project, Neue Soldaten, Schorr juxtaposed documentary-style pictures of a Swedish army battalion with pictures of fake Swedish soldiers played by German teenagers. Schorr’s images not only call into question the fractured role of soldiering in today’s society, but also examine the way nationality, gender, and sexuality influence an individual’s identity.

Gabriel Orozco

Gabriel Orozco uses the urban landscape and the everyday objects found within it to twist conventional notions of reality and engage the imagination of the viewer. Orozco’s interest in complex geometry and mapping find expression in works like the patterned human skull of Black Kites, and the curvilinear logic of Oval Billiard Table. He considers philosophical problems, such as the concept of infinity, and evokes them in humble moments. Matching his passion for political engagement with the poetry of chance encounters, Orozco’s photographs, sculptures, and installations propose a distinctive model for the ways in which artists can affect the world with their work.

Janine Antoni

Janine Antoni’s work blurs the distinction between performance art and sculpture. Transforming everyday activities such as eating, bathing, and sleeping into ways of making art, Antoni’s primary tool for making sculpture has always been her own body. She has chiseled cubes of lard and chocolate with her teeth, washed away the faces of soap busts made in her own likeness, and used the brainwave signals recorded while she dreamed at night as a pattern for weaving a blanket the following morning.

“Gender, religion, nationality—they’re all sort of things that are in flux in my work.”

Collier Schorr

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