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Yun-Fei Ji with Kerry James Marshall at Prospect.3

December 12, 2014

Yun-Fei Ji explains the meaning behind his painted scroll to Kerry James Marshall at the Contemporary Art Center New Orleans for Prospect.3. Troubled by the dying culture of cities in China, Yun-Fei employs a historic method of storytelling to tell contemporary Chinese experience.

“People may abandon this because they don’t think it is modern, but it is,” says Marshall, “I’m interested in how the idea of modernity can evolve in those cultures outside the West.”

More information and credits

Credits

Artist to Artist Created & Produced by: Ian Forster. Editor: Morgan Riles. Cinematography: Ian Forster. Sound: Kyle Sheehan. Production Assistant: Christoph Lerch. Music: Pinch Music. An Art21 Workshop Production. © Art21, Inc. 2014. All Rights Reserved.

Kerry James Marshall at Prospect.3 was supported, in part, by The Lambent Foundation and by individual contributors.

Closed captionsAvailable in English, German, Romanian, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Chinese, Italian

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Yun-Fei Ji

Yun-Fei Ji was born in 1963 in Beijing, China, and now lives and works in New York, Ohio, and Beijing. Using traditional Chinese painting techniques and addressing contemporary social, environmental, and political issues, Ji’s work marries history with the present.

Kerry James Marshall

The subject matter of Kerry James Marshall’s paintings, installations, and public projects is often drawn from African-American popular culture, and is rooted in the geography of his upbringing. Marshall’s work is based on a broad range of art-historical references, from Renaissance painting to black folk art, from El Greco to Charles White. A striking aspect of Marshall’s paintings is the emphatically black skin tone of his figures—a development the artist says emerged from an investigation into the invisibility of blacks in America and the unnecessarily negative connotations associated with darkness. The sheer beauty of his work speaks to an art that is simultaneously formally rigorous and socially engaged.