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Hiwa K in "Berlin"Preview

Hiwa K describes the anecdotal inspirations behind his work in this preview of the upcoming “Berlin” episode from Season 9 of the “Art in the Twenty-First Century” television series.

Shown at work installing “My Father’s Colour Period” (2013), the artist recalls the memory associated with the work. “Color TVs didn’t come to Kurdistan because the government is not investing in those minority areas,” says the artist. “So my father was putting color foil on the TV. It’s a very silent protest.”

Season 9 of “Art in the Twenty-First Century” premieres September 21 at 9:00 p.m. on PBS. “Berlin” airs September 21 at 10:00 p.m.

More information

Closed captionsAvailable in English, German, Romanian, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Chinese, Italian

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Licensing

Interested in showing this film in an exhibition or public screening? To license this video please visit Licensing & Reproduction.

New season of Art in the Twenty-First Century premieres this Friday at 9:00 p.m. on PBS (check local listings). Watch the trailer.

Hiwa K

Hiwa K was born in Sulaymaniyah in Kurdistan, Iraq, in 1975. His sculptures, videos, and performances slyly weave together anecdotes from friends and family members with his biography. As a Kurdish Iraqi and immigrant to Germany, Hiwa K draws from personal memories to tell stories of our ongoing global crises: war, migration, and the effects of neoliberalism and colonialism. Documenting with video, the artist inserts himself into his works, which often involve participatory dimensions (such as group cooking classes, musical performances, and political protests) and collaborations with a wide cast of players, from Iraqi philosophers to Venetian metal casters. Largely self-taught, his multidisciplinary approach draws upon his peer-to-peer education in Iraq as well as his musical training under the Flamenco master, Paco Peña.

“The material tells you, ‘Okay, you are doing quite well.’ You play and you test your borders—as a small chihuahua or dog. You try to see who is the master and the material always stops you.”

Hiwa K